Month: June 2017

Highest honour awarded to Dr Graham Farquhar

Graham Farquhar ANU

Dr Graham Farquhar          (photo: Stuart Hay, ANU)

Congratulations to Australian National University (ANU) scientist, Dr Graham Farquhar, who has become the first Australian to receive the prestigious Nobel-equivalent Kyoto Prize.

The prize is the highest accolade available to scientists in his field and recognises his outstanding body of work improving water-efficient crops and analysing climate change.

ANU vice-chancellor Brian Schmidt, himself a Nobel laureate, said Dr Farquhar’s work was of benefit to the entire world.

A regular user of the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s ANU node, Graham’s work has improved world food security by developing strains of wheat that can grow with less water, and has helped to solve mysteries about why clouds and wind patterns were not changing as climate change models suggested they should.

The Kyoto Prize was established in 1985 and recognises achievements in three fields: basic sciences, arts and philosophy, and advanced technology.

The prize is the latest in a string of accolades for Graham, including the Prime Minister’s Prize for Science in 2015 and Britain’s prestigious Rank Prize, which he shared in 2014 with CSIRO colleague Dr Richard Richards.

More: ABC News

Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences 2017-2026 released

Grow. Make. Prosper. The Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences was published in June 2017 and presents the strategic vision for Australian Agricultural Sciences in the next decade.

The plan outlines strategies to improve the strength and efficiency of agricultural research in Australia in ways that will increase the ability of governments and producers to maintain productivity and efficiency in the face of evolving natural challenges. Successfully identifying, developing and deploying the next generation of game-changing scientific advances remains an active and ongoing challenge. The plan also outlines strategies to capitalise on emerging technologies that will affect the agricultural sciences.

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Agriculture is vitally important to Australia’s economy and social fabric, and contributes to global health and wellbeing. It faces a range of challenges across biophysical, economic and social arenas. Opportunities for technological and production improvements are continuously being identified from scientific research. However, to attain step change improvements in profitability, productivity and sustainability into the future will require integrated multidisciplinary research underpinned by a well-resourced science research pipeline.

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility plays a key role in supporting the next generation of agricultural research designed to answer some of these challenges. This month we will meet with colleagues from fellow NCRIS facilities TERN, BPA, ALA, NeCTAR and NCI to explore opportunities for collaboration, determine where overlaps or synergies occur and discuss bigger picture ideas to ensure NCRIS funding is used most effectively.

Read the full Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences (2017-2026) here.

Find out more about the APPF here.

National National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS)

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN)

Bioplatforms Australia (BPA)

Australian Atlas of Living (ALA)

National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources (NeCTAR)

National Computational Infrastructure (NCI)

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This is your chance! An invaluable opportunity to access phenotyping capabilities to further your plant science research

Do you have an exceptional plant science research project destined to deliver high impact outcomes for Australian agriculture? Do you need access to plant phenotyping capabilities?

The Phenomics Infrastructure for Excellence in Plant Science (PIEPS) scheme was announced in May and is open to all publicly funded researchers. Emphasis is placed on novel collaborations that bring together scientists preferably from different disciplines (e.g. plant physiology, computer science, engineering, biometry, quantitative genetics, molecular biology, chemistry, physics) and from different organisations, within Australia or internationally, to focus on problems in plant science.

The PIEPS scheme involves access to phenotyping capabilities at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) at a reduced cost to facilitate exceptional research projects. Researchers will work in partnership with the APPF to determine experimental design and optimal use of the equipment. Our team includes experts in agriculture, plant physiology, biotechnology, genetics, horticulture, image and data analysis, mechatronic engineering, computer science, software engineering, mathematics and statistics.

Applications are assessed in consultation with the APPF’s independent Scientific Advisory Board. Selection is based on merit.

Don’t miss this an outstanding opportunity to gain access to invaluable expertise and cutting edge technology to accelerate your research project and make a real impact in plant science discovery.

Applications close:  30 September 2017

For more information and to apply:  APPF Phenomics Infrastructure for Excellence in Plant Science (PIEPS)

To find out how we can support your research, contact us.

A presidential visit from Sri Lanka

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s (APPF) node based at the CSIRO in Canberra was thrilled to host His Excellency Maithripala Sirisena, President of Sri Lanka, and his delegation during their visit to Australia, 24 – 26 May.

This was the first time a Sri Lankan Head of State has made a state visit to Australia and marks the 70th anniversary of diplomatic relations between the two countries.

“President Sirisena’s visit will be an opportunity to advance key areas of bilateral cooperation, including education, defense, science and technology, economic development, medical research and the fight against people smuggling,” Australian Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull said in a statement before their meeting.

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Dr Xavier Sirault (right) demonstrates the PlantScan 3D imaging platform to President Sirisena (left) and his delegation at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s node based at the CSIRO in Canberra.

As part of the Canberra visit, the President, who also holds the Cabinet portfolio of Environment, visited the APPF to learn more about plant phenomics which is being used to help tackle the major global challenges of future food production, sustainable agriculture, biodiversity conservation and climate change. The world class facility focuses on deep phenotyping (delving into metabolism and physiological processes within the plant) and reverse phenomics (dissection traits to discover their mechanistic basis).

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Dr Sirault discusses the benefits of the Phenomobile Lite with President Sirisena

Dr Xavier Sirault, Director of the node, shared a number of the facility’s highlights including PlantScan (a 3D imaging platform), ArduCrop (a wireless infrared canopy temperature sensor network), HeliPod (airborne imaging), Phenomobile Lite (an advanced mobile research platform used in non-destructive, high throughput plant phenotyping in the field) and growth chambers.

The President also visited the National Arboretum in Canberra, where he planted a sapling of Mahogany (Toona ciliata) and the ANU-CSIRO Centre for Genomics, Metabolomics and Bioinformatics.

“Sri Lanka can learn a lot from these centres about preserving environment, increasing forest density, and agriculture and food crop research,” said His Excellency Somasundaram Skandakumar, High Commissioner of Sri Lanka.

To find out more about Phenomobile Lite or any other services offered by the APPF node at CSIRO Canberra, please contact Dr Xavier Sirault.

Find out more about the Australian Plan Phenomics Facility.