Month: September 2017

Time to think outside the pot… oops, box! Apply for an APPF postgraduate internship award.

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The next round of Postgraduate Internship Awards at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) will close 30 November, 2017.

Internships are offered at the three APPF locations in Adelaide and Canberra for enthusiastic, highly motivated postgraduate students with a real interest in our research and technology. Current postgraduate students in the following areas are encouraged to apply:

  • Agriculture
  • Bioinformatics
  • Biology
  • Biotechnology
  • Computer Science
  • Genetics
  • Mathematics
  • Plant physiology
  • Science
  • Software engineering
  • Statistics

Interstate? We can help!

We offer postgraduate internship grants which, in general, comprise:

  • $1,500 maximum towards accommodation in Adelaide or Canberra, if required
  • $500 maximum towards travel / airfare, if required

PLUS

  • $10,000 maximum toward infrastructure use!

Multi-disciplinary opportunities

The APPF has identified a number of priority research areas, each reflecting a global challenge and the role that advances in plant biology can play in providing a solution:

  • Tolerance to abiotic stress
  • Improving resource use efficiency in plants
  • Statistics and biometry
  • Application of mechatronic engineering to plant phenotyping
  • Application of image analysis techniques to understanding plant form and function

Students proposing other topics will also be considered.

APPF postgraduate internship grants involve access to the facility’s phenotyping capabilities to undertake collaborative projects and to work as an intern with the APPF team to learn about experimental design, image and data analysis in plant phenomics.

Selection is based on merit. Applications are assessed on the basis of academic record, research experience and appropriateness of the proposed research topic. Interviews may be conducted.

Postgraduate students are encouraged to contact APPF staff prior to submitting their application to discuss possible projects.

For more information and to apply click here.

Bumper funding to enhance national infrastructure and grains research

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Dean of the Waite Mike Keller, GRDC Managing Director Steve Jefferies, and GRDC Chairman John Woods in a greenhouse with DroughtSpotter system at the APPF’s Adelaide node.

 

National infrastructure at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s (APPF) node at the University of Adelaide Waite Precinct will be enhanced as part of a $1.1 million grant announced by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) today.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, Barnaby Joyce, said the funding was another important measure supporting the productivity and profitability of Australia’s grain industries through the development of more drought-resistant crops.

Almost $1 million will be invested at the APPF to build a specialised heat and drought phenotyping facility consisting of two new controlled environment rooms (CERs) fitted with LED lighting and gravimetric watering (DroughtSpotter system), and add further LED lighting in the facility’s greenhouses. The specially fitted CERs are the first of their kind in Australia, and will boost research into improving stress tolerant crops.

GRDC Chairman John Woods said the GRDC Grains R&D Infrastructure Grant was part of $15 million the GRDC Board had agreed to invest in key infrastructure, in a strategy to build national research capacity and to create enduring profitability for grain growers.

A co-contribution from the University of Adelaide supported the GRDC grant which will also add a polytunnel and birdproof enclosure to the Waite Precinct, expanding grains research capabilities.

These investments are expected to improve trait selection and increase trait delivery to breeders, facilitate simultaneous drought and heat experiments, expand bulking and selection capacity, reduce research costs and improve energy use efficiency.

For more information, visit grdc.com.au and the APPF.


What are CERs? CERs enable plants to be grown within precise temperature, light, humidity and other environmental parameters.

What is the DroughtSpotter system? DroughtSpotter is a fully automated gravimetric platform that was made to assess the transpiration dynamics of plants with a precision of up to 1 g. The integrated irrigation units allow precise and reproducible water application for drought stress or related experiments requiring accurate control of water volume to 1 ml.

Don’t miss this chance! Deadline closing for help to access plant phenotyping capabilities

Applications close:  This week – 30 September 2017!

Do you have an exceptional plant science research project destined to deliver high impact outcomes for Australian agriculture? Do you need access to plant phenotyping capabilities?

The Phenomics Infrastructure for Excellence in Plant Science (PIEPS) scheme was announced in May and is open to all publicly funded researchers. Emphasis is placed on novel collaborations that bring together scientists preferably from different disciplines (e.g. plant physiology, computer science, engineering, biometry, quantitative genetics, molecular biology, chemistry, physics) and from different organisations, within Australia or internationally, to focus on problems in plant science.

The PIEPS scheme involves access to phenotyping capabilities at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) at a reduced cost to facilitate exceptional research projects. Researchers will work in partnership with the APPF to determine experimental design and optimal use of the equipment. Our team includes experts in agriculture, plant physiology, biotechnology, genetics, horticulture, image and data analysis, mechatronic engineering, computer science, software engineering, mathematics and statistics.

Applications are assessed in consultation with the APPF’s independent Scientific Advisory Board. Selection is based on merit.

Don’t miss this outstanding opportunity to gain access to invaluable expertise and cutting edge technology to accelerate your research project and make a real impact in plant science discovery.

For more information and to apply:  APPF Phenomics Infrastructure for Excellence in Plant Science (PIEPS)

To find out how we can support your research, contact us.

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Popular ‘Drones in research’ workshop to run again in October

ANDS drone

Australian National Data Service (ANDS) recently hosted a series of events discussing drones, spatial data and geospatial technology including a workshop/seminar event in Canberra in June 2017 followed by two webinars in July. Due to demand, a second workshop event has been added for 9 October in Melbourne.

The workshop, ‘Drones and big spatial data – Challenges and opportunties’ is open to anybody who uses drones for research, or has an interest in doing so. It will be of particular interest to:

  • Researchers (academia, industry and government)
  • Data managers and data librarians
  • Data scientists, analysts, developers and technologists
  • Environmental and geo-scientific research data community
  • Research Office, Ethics Committee members and Legal Counsel for institutions

The workshop is free, however, registration is required for catering purposes. The day will consist of presentations, multiple hands-on tutorials and an opportunity for networking with leading spatial data experts.

When:  Monday, 9 October 2017, 9:00am – 5:00pm

When:  The Woodward Conference Center, University of Melbourne

Speakers:

  • Keith Russell (ANDS/Nectar/RDS):  Introduction to FAIR data principles
  • Sarah Murfitt (Deakin University):  Applications of unmanned aerial vehicles for mapping coastal processes and intertidal marine habitats
  • Lisa Frye / Brendan Zwaaniken (DELWP):  Negotiating barriers and managing risks with RPAS:  Innovating approaches to regulations, permits, and safety
  • Alena Moison (DELWP):  A platform for storing, processing and sharing Victoria’s open drone data
  • Nathan Quadros (CRCSI):  An automated workflow to ensure end users capture LiDAR and drone data which meets their needs (https://qa4lab.com/)
  • More to be added

Hands on practicals

  • Xavier Goldie (AURIN):  Introduction to AURIN facilities – Software and tools
  • Nathan Quadros (CRCSI):  Drone user needs and applications
  • Fabiana Santana (University of Canberra):  How drone data could be used in modeling? A case study applying the BCCVL

 

Click here for more information and to register.

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) and ANDS are part of a community of facilities supported by the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). The NCRIS network currently supports national research capability through 27 active projects and is comprised of 222 institutions employing well over 1,700 highly skilled technical experts, researchers and facility managers. NCRIS facilities are used by over 35,000 researchers, both domestically and internationally.