Education

The hunt for high salt tolerant barley crops gets closer

Barley-(optimised-for-web)

Soil salinity severely impacts crop growth and yield. Within minutes of exposure to salt, cell expansion, leaf expansion, photosynthesis, transpiration and tillering are reduced. When salts accumulate to toxic concentrations in the shoot, especially in older leaves, a secondary inhibition of growth occurs through damage to the plant’s metabolism and ion imbalances. These effects occur weeks to months following salt application.

Plants have evolved numerous mechanisms to detect and respond to the effects of salt stress including a range of signal transduction mechanisms. However, investigating the maintenance of growth under salt stress has been limited by the lack of techniques that allow nondestructive measurements of plant growth through time. The resources and technologies now exist to phenotype many genotypes and identify those with high shoot ion-independent and shoot ion-dependent tolerance under greenhouse conditions.

Barley is one of the more salt-tolerant crops, able to grow in higher concentrations of salt than wheat, rice or maize. However, the growth of barley is still significantly affected by salinity. A better understanding of the genetic variation for salinity tolerance mechanisms within barley cultivars is required for future breeding improvement.

In a study by Stuart Roy and his international collaborators, nondestructive and destructive measurements are used to evaluate the responses of 24 predominately Australian barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) lines at 0, 150 and 250 mM NaCl. Considerable variation for shoot tolerance mechanisms not related to ion toxicity (shoot ion-independent tolerance) was found, with some lines being able to maintain substantial growth rates under salt stress, whereas others stopped growing. Hordeum vulgare spp. spontaneum accessions and barley landraces predominantly had the best shoot ion independent tolerance, although two commercial cultivars, Fathom and Skiff, also had high tolerance. The tolerance of cv. Fathom may be caused by a recent introgression from H. vulgare L. spp. spontaneum.

This study shows that the most salt-tolerant barley lines are those that contain both shoot ion-independent tolerance and the ability to exclude Na+ from the shoot (and thus maintain high K+:Na+ ratios).

Read the full paper, ‘Variation in shoot tolerance mechanisms not related to ion toxicity in barley’, here (Functional Plant Biologyhttps://doi.org/10.1071/FP17049).

To find out how the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility can help facilitate your plant science research visit our website.

Time to think outside the pot… oops, box! Apply for an APPF postgraduate internship award.

Bettina-in-smarthouse-3000-x-800

The next round of Postgraduate Internship Awards at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) will close 30 November, 2017.

Internships are offered at the three APPF locations in Adelaide and Canberra for enthusiastic, highly motivated postgraduate students with a real interest in our research and technology. Current postgraduate students in the following areas are encouraged to apply:

  • Agriculture
  • Bioinformatics
  • Biology
  • Biotechnology
  • Computer Science
  • Genetics
  • Mathematics
  • Plant physiology
  • Science
  • Software engineering
  • Statistics

Interstate? We can help!

We offer postgraduate internship grants which, in general, comprise:

  • $1,500 maximum towards accommodation in Adelaide or Canberra, if required
  • $500 maximum towards travel / airfare, if required

PLUS

  • $10,000 maximum toward infrastructure use!

Multi-disciplinary opportunities

The APPF has identified a number of priority research areas, each reflecting a global challenge and the role that advances in plant biology can play in providing a solution:

  • Tolerance to abiotic stress
  • Improving resource use efficiency in plants
  • Statistics and biometry
  • Application of mechatronic engineering to plant phenotyping
  • Application of image analysis techniques to understanding plant form and function

Students proposing other topics will also be considered.

APPF postgraduate internship grants involve access to the facility’s phenotyping capabilities to undertake collaborative projects and to work as an intern with the APPF team to learn about experimental design, image and data analysis in plant phenomics.

Selection is based on merit. Applications are assessed on the basis of academic record, research experience and appropriateness of the proposed research topic. Interviews may be conducted.

Postgraduate students are encouraged to contact APPF staff prior to submitting their application to discuss possible projects.

For more information and to apply click here.

Popular ‘Drones in research’ workshop to run again in October

ANDS drone

Australian National Data Service (ANDS) recently hosted a series of events discussing drones, spatial data and geospatial technology including a workshop/seminar event in Canberra in June 2017 followed by two webinars in July. Due to demand, a second workshop event has been added for 9 October in Melbourne.

The workshop, ‘Drones and big spatial data – Challenges and opportunties’ is open to anybody who uses drones for research, or has an interest in doing so. It will be of particular interest to:

  • Researchers (academia, industry and government)
  • Data managers and data librarians
  • Data scientists, analysts, developers and technologists
  • Environmental and geo-scientific research data community
  • Research Office, Ethics Committee members and Legal Counsel for institutions

The workshop is free, however, registration is required for catering purposes. The day will consist of presentations, multiple hands-on tutorials and an opportunity for networking with leading spatial data experts.

When:  Monday, 9 October 2017, 9:00am – 5:00pm

When:  The Woodward Conference Center, University of Melbourne

Speakers:

  • Keith Russell (ANDS/Nectar/RDS):  Introduction to FAIR data principles
  • Sarah Murfitt (Deakin University):  Applications of unmanned aerial vehicles for mapping coastal processes and intertidal marine habitats
  • Lisa Frye / Brendan Zwaaniken (DELWP):  Negotiating barriers and managing risks with RPAS:  Innovating approaches to regulations, permits, and safety
  • Alena Moison (DELWP):  A platform for storing, processing and sharing Victoria’s open drone data
  • Nathan Quadros (CRCSI):  An automated workflow to ensure end users capture LiDAR and drone data which meets their needs (https://qa4lab.com/)
  • More to be added

Hands on practicals

  • Xavier Goldie (AURIN):  Introduction to AURIN facilities – Software and tools
  • Nathan Quadros (CRCSI):  Drone user needs and applications
  • Fabiana Santana (University of Canberra):  How drone data could be used in modeling? A case study applying the BCCVL

 

Click here for more information and to register.

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) and ANDS are part of a community of facilities supported by the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). The NCRIS network currently supports national research capability through 27 active projects and is comprised of 222 institutions employing well over 1,700 highly skilled technical experts, researchers and facility managers. NCRIS facilities are used by over 35,000 researchers, both domestically and internationally.

Next gen chase research break-throughs with unrivalled access to plant phenotyping technology

Our latest round of Postgraduate Internship Award (PIA) students have kicked off their research projects at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF)!

All our student interns have the unique opportunity to access the APPF’s cutting-edge phenotyping capabilities at no cost, learning about experimental design, and image and data anaylsis in plant phenomics while undertaking collaborative projects with the highly skilled APPF team. This experience allows our next generation of aspiring plant scientists to explore key research questions, reveal new data and make a real contribution to the global challenge of feeding future generations.

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Yue Qu (Julian) with his soybean plants in an automated, high-throughput plant phenotyping Smarthouse at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s Adelaide node

Yue Qu (Julian)

In his project ‘Investigating novel mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance in soybean’ Julian seeks to answer two questions, (1) Does GmSALT3, a protein linked to improved salt tolerance, also confer tolerance to drought and oxidative stress in soybean, and (2) Does GmSALT3 improve growth under standard conditions. He will use a non-destructive, high-throughput plant phenotyping Smarthouse, hyperspectral leaf phenotyping, leaf ion content, ROS activity/detoxification of roots, and gas exchange to investigate 8 lines of soybean in combination with 4 treatments (control, drought, 100mM NaCl, 150mM NaCl).

“For my PhD I have been functionally characterising GmSALT3. I have used heterologous expression systems to examine transport activity, as well as phenotyping salt tolerance in the NILs,” said Julian.

However, more recent phenotyping data and RNA-seq analysis has led us to the hypothesis that the salt tolerance phenotype of GmSALT3 plants is a consequence of their improved ability to detoxify reactive oxygen species, and therefore they may be more stress tolerant in general. This is contrary to the prevailing hypothesis that the protein is directly involved in salt transport and directly, rather than indirectly confers salt exclusion. To test this hypothesis we need to properly phenotype the Near Isogenic Lines (NILs). We believe that the phenotyping capabilities of the APPF will give unparalleled insights into the stress tolerance of soybean that would not otherwise be possible. Such a finding will be a significant breakthrough and likely result in a high impact publication when added to our existing data.”

Supervisor, Professor Matthew Gilliham, from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology agreed. “The experience the APPF team offer while conducting these experiments will add a great deal to the impact of the papers Julian is preparing and reveal a new layer of complexity that would not be possible without their expertise.”

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Daniel Menadue watches over his wheat plants in a Smarthouse at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s Adelaide node

Daniel Menadue

Daniel is investigating a proton pumping pyrophosphatase (PPase) gene family in wheat and the role these genes play in the wheat plant’s response to environmental stress in and enhancing yield.

Vacuolar pyrophosphatase have been known for a while to be involved in a plant’s adaptation to the environment, however, the majority of the work on these genes has been using the gene from Arabidopsis, AVP1. Daniel’s research has identified the 12 wheat orthologs of AVP1 and from the sequence and expression data he has to date, he hypothesises that different PPases have different roles depending on their protein sequence and tissue localisation. To this end Daniel has generated transgenic bread wheat, cv Fielder, expressing two of the wheat genes (TaVP1-B and TaVP2-B) to further characterise the role of the PPase protein. Excitingly, Daniel has observed a growth phenotype, in the second generation of transgenic plants, with the transgenic plants appearing to grow faster and have larger biomass than wild type or null segregant plants. This is a phenotype previously seen in transgenic barley expressing the Arabidopsis AVP1 gene, plants which went on to show enhanced yield under salinity in the field (Schilling et al. 2014, Plant Biotech J.).

Given the very promising phenotype of these lines, Daniel will dissect this mechanism further using the non-destructive imaging capabilities at the APPF as an ideal platform for such experiments. He will investigate when the transgenic lines exhibit their enhanced growth, dissect whether they grow faster throughout the vegetative period or just for a short while at the start of their growth. He will also investigate the possibilities of following the growth of leaves through time and determine if the plants have enhanced resistance to salinity tolerance.

“In many ways we would like to replicate the study that we did in one of the APPF’s Adelaide Smarthouses which produced the barley data for the Schilling et al. 2014 paper, but in much more detail and using wheat plants with wheat genes,” said supervisor, Dr Stuart Roy from the University of Adelaide’s School of Agriculture, Food and Wine.

“We envision that the data obtained from Daniel’s study will form the basis of at least one research publication and, if the results are promising, open up new areas of research and delivery for bread wheat with altered PPases expression levels through my International Wheat Yield Partnership project, AVP1, PSTOL1 and NAS – Three high-value genes for higher wheat yield.” – shared in our recent blog story ‘International consortia tackle the global challenge to increase wheat yields at the APPF’.

It’s a pleasure to welcome Julian and Daniel to the team!

The next round of Postgraduate Internship Awards at this APPF will close 30 November, 2017 – Apply now!

Internships are offered at the APPF in Adelaide and Canberra for enthusiastic, highly motivated postgraduate students with a real interest in our research and technology. Current postgraduate students in the following areas are encouraged to apply:

  • Agriculture
  • Bioinformatics
  • Biology
  • Biotechnology
  • Computer Science
  • Genetics
  • Mathematics
  • Plant physiology
  • Science
  • Software engineering
  • Statistics

Interstate students are strongly encouraged to apply!

We offer postgraduate internship grants which, in general, comprise:

  • $1,500 maximum towards accommodation in Adelaide or Canberra, if required
  • $500 maximum towards travel / airfare, if required
  • $10,000 maximum toward infrastructure use

The APPF has identified a number of priority research areas, each reflecting a global challenge and the role that advances in plant biology can play in providing a solution:

  • Tolerance to abiotic stress
  • Improving resource use efficiency in plants
  • Statistics and biometry
  • Application of mechatronic engineering to plant phenotyping
  • Application of image analysis techniques to understanding plant form and function

Students proposing other topics will also be considered.

APPF postgraduate internship grants involve access to the facility’s phenotyping capabilities to undertake collaborative projects and to work as an intern with the APPF team to learn about experimental design, image and data analysis in plant phenomics.

Selection is based on merit. Applications are assessed on the basis of academic record, research experience and appropriateness of the proposed research topic. Interviews may be conducted.

Postgraduate students are encouraged to contact APPF staff prior to submitting their application to discuss possible projects.

For more information and to apply click here.

Invitation: ‘Drones in research’ webinar series

Ramesh Booleroo field Drone flight 2 (edited)

Dr Ramesh Raja Segaran from APPF partner, URAF, demonstrating field phenotyping with a drone

Australian National Data Service (ANDS) is running two webinars on ‘Drones in Research’ this July. The webinars are free of charge and open to anybody who uses drones for research, or has an interest in doing so. They will be of particular interest to:

  • Researchers (academia, industry and government)
  • Data managers and data librarians
  • Data scientists, analysts, developers and technologists
  • Environmental and geo-scientific research data community
  • Research Office, Ethics Committee members and Legal Counsel for institutions

 

  • Webinar #1:  An eye on legal, ethics, safety & privacy
    When:  Thursday, 20 July 2017 at 12.30pm AEST (one hour duration)
    Description:  When deploying drones for research, it is important to be aware of legal and privacy issues under current Australian law, and have an understanding of public safety and community attitude.

    Speakers:  Melanie Olsen, AIMSA requirement of special licensing from CASA for drone useDes Butler, QUTThe privacy implication of using drones under current Australian lawLeanne Wiseman, Griffith UniversityDrones and geospatial data: A look at the legal and ethical issues [IP and copyright].

  • Webinar #2:  Rise of drones in the Australian research space
    When:  Thursday, Thursday 27 July 2017 at 12.30 AEST (one hour duration)Description:  This second webinar brings together researchers and data specialists from various disciplines to showcase their drone applications and data expertise, and to share knowledge to enhance research capabilities.

    Speakers:  Siddeswara Guru, TERN – Making drone data open for scientific research – Kim Bryceson, QUT – Automation of drone data capture in agriculture and development of GIS data library – Third speaker TBC.

The webinars are free, however, registration is required.

Both webinars will be recorded. If you can’t attend, please do register and ANDS will send you the recording and additional links.

Click here for more information and to register.

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) and ANDS are part of a community of facilities supported by the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). The NCRIS network currently supports national research capability through 27 active projects and is comprised of 222 institutions employing well over 1,700 highly skilled technical experts, researchers and facility managers. NCRIS facilities are used by over 35,000 researchers, both domestically and internationally.

Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences 2017-2026 released

Grow. Make. Prosper. The Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences was published in June 2017 and presents the strategic vision for Australian Agricultural Sciences in the next decade.

The plan outlines strategies to improve the strength and efficiency of agricultural research in Australia in ways that will increase the ability of governments and producers to maintain productivity and efficiency in the face of evolving natural challenges. Successfully identifying, developing and deploying the next generation of game-changing scientific advances remains an active and ongoing challenge. The plan also outlines strategies to capitalise on emerging technologies that will affect the agricultural sciences.

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Agriculture is vitally important to Australia’s economy and social fabric, and contributes to global health and wellbeing. It faces a range of challenges across biophysical, economic and social arenas. Opportunities for technological and production improvements are continuously being identified from scientific research. However, to attain step change improvements in profitability, productivity and sustainability into the future will require integrated multidisciplinary research underpinned by a well-resourced science research pipeline.

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility plays a key role in supporting the next generation of agricultural research designed to answer some of these challenges. This month we will meet with colleagues from fellow NCRIS facilities TERN, BPA, ALA, NeCTAR and NCI to explore opportunities for collaboration, determine where overlaps or synergies occur and discuss bigger picture ideas to ensure NCRIS funding is used most effectively.

Read the full Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences (2017-2026) here.

Find out more about the APPF here.

National National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS)

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN)

Bioplatforms Australia (BPA)

Australian Atlas of Living (ALA)

National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources (NeCTAR)

National Computational Infrastructure (NCI)

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This is your chance! An invaluable opportunity to access phenotyping capabilities to further your plant science research

Do you have an exceptional plant science research project destined to deliver high impact outcomes for Australian agriculture? Do you need access to plant phenotyping capabilities?

The Phenomics Infrastructure for Excellence in Plant Science (PIEPS) scheme was announced in May and is open to all publicly funded researchers. Emphasis is placed on novel collaborations that bring together scientists preferably from different disciplines (e.g. plant physiology, computer science, engineering, biometry, quantitative genetics, molecular biology, chemistry, physics) and from different organisations, within Australia or internationally, to focus on problems in plant science.

The PIEPS scheme involves access to phenotyping capabilities at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) at a reduced cost to facilitate exceptional research projects. Researchers will work in partnership with the APPF to determine experimental design and optimal use of the equipment. Our team includes experts in agriculture, plant physiology, biotechnology, genetics, horticulture, image and data analysis, mechatronic engineering, computer science, software engineering, mathematics and statistics.

Applications are assessed in consultation with the APPF’s independent Scientific Advisory Board. Selection is based on merit.

Don’t miss this an outstanding opportunity to gain access to invaluable expertise and cutting edge technology to accelerate your research project and make a real impact in plant science discovery.

Applications close:  30 September 2017

For more information and to apply:  APPF Phenomics Infrastructure for Excellence in Plant Science (PIEPS)

To find out how we can support your research, contact us.