Education

Next gen chase research break-throughs with unrivalled access to plant phenotyping technology

Our latest round of Postgraduate Internship Award (PIA) students have kicked off their research projects at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF)!

All our student interns have the unique opportunity to access the APPF’s cutting-edge phenotyping capabilities at no cost, learning about experimental design, and image and data anaylsis in plant phenomics while undertaking collaborative projects with the highly skilled APPF team. This experience allows our next generation of aspiring plant scientists to explore key research questions, reveal new data and make a real contribution to the global challenge of feeding future generations.

Julian montage test

Yue Qu (Julian) with his soybean plants in an automated, high-throughput plant phenotyping Smarthouse at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s Adelaide node

Yue Qu (Julian)

In his project ‘Investigating novel mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance in soybean’ Julian seeks to answer two questions, (1) Does GmSALT3, a protein linked to improved salt tolerance, also confer tolerance to drought and oxidative stress in soybean, and (2) Does GmSALT3 improve growth under standard conditions. He will use a non-destructive, high-throughput plant phenotyping Smarthouse, hyperspectral leaf phenotyping, leaf ion content, ROS activity/detoxification of roots, and gas exchange to investigate 8 lines of soybean in combination with 4 treatments (control, drought, 100mM NaCl, 150mM NaCl).

“For my PhD I have been functionally characterising GmSALT3. I have used heterologous expression systems to examine transport activity, as well as phenotyping salt tolerance in the NILs,” said Julian.

However, more recent phenotyping data and RNA-seq analysis has led us to the hypothesis that the salt tolerance phenotype of GmSALT3 plants is a consequence of their improved ability to detoxify reactive oxygen species, and therefore they may be more stress tolerant in general. This is contrary to the prevailing hypothesis that the protein is directly involved in salt transport and directly, rather than indirectly confers salt exclusion. To test this hypothesis we need to properly phenotype the Near Isogenic Lines (NILs). We believe that the phenotyping capabilities of the APPF will give unparalleled insights into the stress tolerance of soybean that would not otherwise be possible. Such a finding will be a significant breakthrough and likely result in a high impact publication when added to our existing data.”

Supervisor, Professor Matthew Gilliham, from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology agreed. “The experience the APPF team offer while conducting these experiments will add a great deal to the impact of the papers Julian is preparing and reveal a new layer of complexity that would not be possible without their expertise.”

Daniel montage

Daniel Menadue watches over his wheat plants in a Smarthouse at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s Adelaide node

Daniel Menadue

Daniel is investigating a proton pumping pyrophosphatase (PPase) gene family in wheat and the role these genes play in the wheat plant’s response to environmental stress in and enhancing yield.

Vacuolar pyrophosphatase have been known for a while to be involved in a plant’s adaptation to the environment, however, the majority of the work on these genes has been using the gene from Arabidopsis, AVP1. Daniel’s research has identified the 12 wheat orthologs of AVP1 and from the sequence and expression data he has to date, he hypothesises that different PPases have different roles depending on their protein sequence and tissue localisation. To this end Daniel has generated transgenic bread wheat, cv Fielder, expressing two of the wheat genes (TaVP1-B and TaVP2-B) to further characterise the role of the PPase protein. Excitingly, Daniel has observed a growth phenotype, in the second generation of transgenic plants, with the transgenic plants appearing to grow faster and have larger biomass than wild type or null segregant plants. This is a phenotype previously seen in transgenic barley expressing the Arabidopsis AVP1 gene, plants which went on to show enhanced yield under salinity in the field (Schilling et al. 2014, Plant Biotech J.).

Given the very promising phenotype of these lines, Daniel will dissect this mechanism further using the non-destructive imaging capabilities at the APPF as an ideal platform for such experiments. He will investigate when the transgenic lines exhibit their enhanced growth, dissect whether they grow faster throughout the vegetative period or just for a short while at the start of their growth. He will also investigate the possibilities of following the growth of leaves through time and determine if the plants have enhanced resistance to salinity tolerance.

“In many ways we would like to replicate the study that we did in one of the APPF’s Adelaide Smarthouses which produced the barley data for the Schilling et al. 2014 paper, but in much more detail and using wheat plants with wheat genes,” said supervisor, Dr Stuart Roy from the University of Adelaide’s School of Agriculture, Food and Wine.

“We envision that the data obtained from Daniel’s study will form the basis of at least one research publication and, if the results are promising, open up new areas of research and delivery for bread wheat with altered PPases expression levels through my International Wheat Yield Partnership project, AVP1, PSTOL1 and NAS – Three high-value genes for higher wheat yield.” – shared in our recent blog story ‘International consortia tackle the global challenge to increase wheat yields at the APPF’.

It’s a pleasure to welcome Julian and Daniel to the team!

The next round of Postgraduate Internship Awards at this APPF will close 30 November, 2017 – Apply now!

Internships are offered at the APPF in Adelaide and Canberra for enthusiastic, highly motivated postgraduate students with a real interest in our research and technology. Current postgraduate students in the following areas are encouraged to apply:

  • Agriculture
  • Bioinformatics
  • Biology
  • Biotechnology
  • Computer Science
  • Genetics
  • Mathematics
  • Plant physiology
  • Science
  • Software engineering
  • Statistics

Interstate students are strongly encouraged to apply!

We offer postgraduate internship grants which, in general, comprise:

  • $1,500 maximum towards accommodation in Adelaide or Canberra, if required
  • $500 maximum towards travel / airfare, if required
  • $10,000 maximum toward infrastructure use

The APPF has identified a number of priority research areas, each reflecting a global challenge and the role that advances in plant biology can play in providing a solution:

  • Tolerance to abiotic stress
  • Improving resource use efficiency in plants
  • Statistics and biometry
  • Application of mechatronic engineering to plant phenotyping
  • Application of image analysis techniques to understanding plant form and function

Students proposing other topics will also be considered.

APPF postgraduate internship grants involve access to the facility’s phenotyping capabilities to undertake collaborative projects and to work as an intern with the APPF team to learn about experimental design, image and data analysis in plant phenomics.

Selection is based on merit. Applications are assessed on the basis of academic record, research experience and appropriateness of the proposed research topic. Interviews may be conducted.

Postgraduate students are encouraged to contact APPF staff prior to submitting their application to discuss possible projects.

For more information and to apply click here.

Invitation: ‘Drones in research’ webinar series

Ramesh Booleroo field Drone flight 2 (edited)

Dr Ramesh Raja Segaran from APPF partner, URAF, demonstrating field phenotyping with a drone

Australian National Data Service (ANDS) is running two webinars on ‘Drones in Research’ this July. The webinars are free of charge and open to anybody who uses drones for research, or has an interest in doing so. They will be of particular interest to:

  • Researchers (academia, industry and government)
  • Data managers and data librarians
  • Data scientists, analysts, developers and technologists
  • Environmental and geo-scientific research data community
  • Research Office, Ethics Committee members and Legal Counsel for institutions

 

  • Webinar #1:  An eye on legal, ethics, safety & privacy
    When:  Thursday, 20 July 2017 at 12.30pm AEST (one hour duration)
    Description:  When deploying drones for research, it is important to be aware of legal and privacy issues under current Australian law, and have an understanding of public safety and community attitude.

    Speakers:  Melanie Olsen, AIMSA requirement of special licensing from CASA for drone useDes Butler, QUTThe privacy implication of using drones under current Australian lawLeanne Wiseman, Griffith UniversityDrones and geospatial data: A look at the legal and ethical issues [IP and copyright].

  • Webinar #2:  Rise of drones in the Australian research space
    When:  Thursday, Thursday 27 July 2017 at 12.30 AEST (one hour duration)Description:  This second webinar brings together researchers and data specialists from various disciplines to showcase their drone applications and data expertise, and to share knowledge to enhance research capabilities.

    Speakers:  Siddeswara Guru, TERN – Making drone data open for scientific research – Kim Bryceson, QUT – Automation of drone data capture in agriculture and development of GIS data library – Third speaker TBC.

The webinars are free, however, registration is required.

Both webinars will be recorded. If you can’t attend, please do register and ANDS will send you the recording and additional links.

Click here for more information and to register.

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) and ANDS are part of a community of facilities supported by the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). The NCRIS network currently supports national research capability through 27 active projects and is comprised of 222 institutions employing well over 1,700 highly skilled technical experts, researchers and facility managers. NCRIS facilities are used by over 35,000 researchers, both domestically and internationally.

Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences 2017-2026 released

Grow. Make. Prosper. The Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences was published in June 2017 and presents the strategic vision for Australian Agricultural Sciences in the next decade.

The plan outlines strategies to improve the strength and efficiency of agricultural research in Australia in ways that will increase the ability of governments and producers to maintain productivity and efficiency in the face of evolving natural challenges. Successfully identifying, developing and deploying the next generation of game-changing scientific advances remains an active and ongoing challenge. The plan also outlines strategies to capitalise on emerging technologies that will affect the agricultural sciences.

PhenomobileLite_16_JamieScarrow (sm)

Agriculture is vitally important to Australia’s economy and social fabric, and contributes to global health and wellbeing. It faces a range of challenges across biophysical, economic and social arenas. Opportunities for technological and production improvements are continuously being identified from scientific research. However, to attain step change improvements in profitability, productivity and sustainability into the future will require integrated multidisciplinary research underpinned by a well-resourced science research pipeline.

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility plays a key role in supporting the next generation of agricultural research designed to answer some of these challenges. This month we will meet with colleagues from fellow NCRIS facilities TERN, BPA, ALA, NeCTAR and NCI to explore opportunities for collaboration, determine where overlaps or synergies occur and discuss bigger picture ideas to ensure NCRIS funding is used most effectively.

Read the full Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences (2017-2026) here.

Find out more about the APPF here.

National National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS)

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN)

Bioplatforms Australia (BPA)

Australian Atlas of Living (ALA)

National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources (NeCTAR)

National Computational Infrastructure (NCI)

2014-09-23_14-09-45_HDR

This is your chance! An invaluable opportunity to access phenotyping capabilities to further your plant science research

Do you have an exceptional plant science research project destined to deliver high impact outcomes for Australian agriculture? Do you need access to plant phenotyping capabilities?

The Phenomics Infrastructure for Excellence in Plant Science (PIEPS) scheme was announced in May and is open to all publicly funded researchers. Emphasis is placed on novel collaborations that bring together scientists preferably from different disciplines (e.g. plant physiology, computer science, engineering, biometry, quantitative genetics, molecular biology, chemistry, physics) and from different organisations, within Australia or internationally, to focus on problems in plant science.

The PIEPS scheme involves access to phenotyping capabilities at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) at a reduced cost to facilitate exceptional research projects. Researchers will work in partnership with the APPF to determine experimental design and optimal use of the equipment. Our team includes experts in agriculture, plant physiology, biotechnology, genetics, horticulture, image and data analysis, mechatronic engineering, computer science, software engineering, mathematics and statistics.

Applications are assessed in consultation with the APPF’s independent Scientific Advisory Board. Selection is based on merit.

Don’t miss this an outstanding opportunity to gain access to invaluable expertise and cutting edge technology to accelerate your research project and make a real impact in plant science discovery.

Applications close:  30 September 2017

For more information and to apply:  APPF Phenomics Infrastructure for Excellence in Plant Science (PIEPS)

To find out how we can support your research, contact us.

A presidential visit from Sri Lanka

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s (APPF) node based at the CSIRO in Canberra was thrilled to host His Excellency Maithripala Sirisena, President of Sri Lanka, and his delegation during their visit to Australia, 24 – 26 May.

This was the first time a Sri Lankan Head of State has made a state visit to Australia and marks the 70th anniversary of diplomatic relations between the two countries.

“President Sirisena’s visit will be an opportunity to advance key areas of bilateral cooperation, including education, defense, science and technology, economic development, medical research and the fight against people smuggling,” Australian Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull said in a statement before their meeting.

5D3_3803_JamieScarrow

Dr Xavier Sirault (right) demonstrates the PlantScan 3D imaging platform to President Sirisena (left) and his delegation at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s node based at the CSIRO in Canberra.

As part of the Canberra visit, the President, who also holds the Cabinet portfolio of Environment, visited the APPF to learn more about plant phenomics which is being used to help tackle the major global challenges of future food production, sustainable agriculture, biodiversity conservation and climate change. The world class facility focuses on deep phenotyping (delving into metabolism and physiological processes within the plant) and reverse phenomics (dissection traits to discover their mechanistic basis).

5D3_3731_JamieScarrow

Dr Sirault discusses the benefits of the Phenomobile Lite with President Sirisena

Dr Xavier Sirault, Director of the node, shared a number of the facility’s highlights including PlantScan (a 3D imaging platform), ArduCrop (a wireless infrared canopy temperature sensor network), HeliPod (airborne imaging), Phenomobile Lite (an advanced mobile research platform used in non-destructive, high throughput plant phenotyping in the field) and growth chambers.

The President also visited the National Arboretum in Canberra, where he planted a sapling of Mahogany (Toona ciliata) and the ANU-CSIRO Centre for Genomics, Metabolomics and Bioinformatics.

“Sri Lanka can learn a lot from these centres about preserving environment, increasing forest density, and agriculture and food crop research,” said His Excellency Somasundaram Skandakumar, High Commissioner of Sri Lanka.

To find out more about Phenomobile Lite or any other services offered by the APPF node at CSIRO Canberra, please contact Dr Xavier Sirault.

Find out more about the Australian Plan Phenomics Facility.

Taking five with Prof. Justin Borevitz

The three national nodes of the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) are home to a highly talented team of plant science researchers and specialists. This passionate, cross-disciplinary team is skilled in areas such as agriculture, plant physiology, biotechnology, genetics, horticulture, image and data analysis, mechatronic engineering, computer science, software engineering, mathematics and statistics. But who are they?

Today we take five minutes to get to know…

Prof. Justin Borevitz

APPF Portraits-2

Tell us about where you work within the APPF.

I lead the Canberra ANU node of the APPF. Our node is part of the Australian National University (ANU) Plant Science Division which is a world leader in plant research. In addition to the APPF, ANU Plant Sciences contains the Centre of Excellence (CoE) in Plant Energy Biology (PEB), CoE Translational Photosynthesis (CoETP) and the ANU-CSIRO Centre for Genomics, Metabolomics and Bioinformatics.

The Canberra ANU node of the APPF offers:

  • On-site phenomics and plant growth services – NextGen growth and phenotyping facilities for Australian and international researchers including greenhouses and growth chambers with timelapse imaging.
  • Genomics and bioinformatics, study design and data analysis support – analysis of phenotypic and genomics data and the opportunity to collaborate with world-class researchers in genomics, photosynthesis and bioinformatics.
  • Development and streamlining of cross-scale approaches in monitoring for scaling from lab to field, chamber to crop and forest.
  • Research and development of open source hardware and software pipelines and visualisation tools for enabling lower cost high-throughput phenotyping (HTP) and environmental monitoring.
  • A collaborative, cross-disciplinary approach to tackling the grand challenges associated with HTP and environmental monitoring.

We provide the only quarantine approved growth cabinets in Canberra for research purposes. A range of growth cabinets are available, capable of high resolution phenotyping of up to 2,000 small plants continuously in custom and climate-simulated growth environments (LED-based). Quantitative phenotypic screening for Arabidopsis and similar sized small plants can be conducted.

2014-09-23_14-09-45_HDR

Virtual reality is the new frontier in scientific visualisation. We also offer the ability to visualise a forest in virtual reality with sensor data overlays for a visually integrated understanding of the landscape. The APPF is a leader in the development of systems for visualising phenomics and environmental sensing data and point clouds in virtual and augmented reality (VR an AR). EcoVR is a virtual reality tool for recreating any forest or field site as a virtual space, where timelapse sensor and phenomics data can be overlaid on a 3-dimensional model of the landscape. VR and AR represent immense opportunities for revolutionising phenomics and education and for industry collaborations to develop new visualisation platforms for precision agriculture. These tools can help farmers understand their farming landscape and can be used by the forestry industry to understand how the landscape, environment and genetics interact to impact forest growth.

What do you do there?

I’m Scientific Director, overseeing all research projects.

What is the best part of your job?

I get the most enjoyment out of planning new experiments.

Where do you see plant phenomics research in 5-10 years time?

Digital, machine learning, interconnected sensors and farm equipment, and providing food and environmental services (carbon, water, nutrient management).

“The moment I realised I loved plant science was…”

On my dad’s farm, growing new release strawberries when I was 15 years old.

If you could solve one plant science question, what would it be?

Climate ready, high yielding crops that increase soil fertility.

“When I’m not working I am…”

You’ll find me kayaking or gardening (integrative problem solving).

If you could have one super power, what would it be?

I’d like to be able to communicate knowledge into understanding for rational decision making.

“If I wasn’t a plant scientist I would be a…”

Definitely a ski bumb!

What is your idea of absolute happiness?

My family.

What is your most treasured possession?

Again, my family.

What scares you?

Cancer, but also reaching global limits.

If you could go backwards or forwards in time, where would you go?

I’d like to see my grandfather as a child in Poland on his family farm, and my daughter as a grandmother on her urban farm.

Contact Professor Justin Borevitz

Screen Shot 2017-05-31 at 2.33.00 pm

Supporting the agricultural industry through R&D to deliver successful new products to market

Developing and bringing new agricultural products to market can be costly and time consuming for industry. Nufarm Limited recently sought the technology and expertise of the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) to provide independent testing on potential new foliar sprays under development.

“The full service approach at the APPF, from the technology to the specialist staff, really appealed to us”, said Chad Sayer from Nufarm’s Product Strategy Group.

“The non-destructive, high-throughput phenotyping technology at the APPF gave us the ability to gain insights into our products under development that we could not achieve anywhere else. Their highly skilled, specialist team helped us design our experiments and provided invaluable advice throughout the project, right through to the data analysis.

“This has been exciting for us. Our pilot project delivered such promising results, we already have a large project underway”.

Nufarm wheat 000335

(L) Plants undergoing spray treatment.  (R) Daily observation and analysis by the horticultural team

“We have a bespoke approach, working closely with our customers to design their experiments to deliver the best results”, said Dr Bettina Berger, Scientific Director at the Adelaide node of the APPF.

Dr Berger and her colleagues provide consultation on all projects carried out at the Adelaide node, supporting the development of the initial design and execution of the research. The specialist horticultural team set up the experiments and manage them through to completion. Customers can make use of online monitoring and access of projects throughout the experiment stage via Zegami (‘live processing’ which allows result checking on a day-to-day basis). On completion of experiments image analysis and data analysis are handled by our skilled engineering, software and statistics team. The research team then provide consultation on results and further follow-up as required.

0382 on 5-5-17 (6)

Plants in a Smarthouse at the Adelaide node of the APPF undergo daily image analysis throughout the experiment

The APPF is available to all publicly or commercially funded researchers. For further information or to discuss how we can support your research, please visit the APPF website for contact details. For more information about this project, contact Dr Berger.

Nufarm Limited is an Australian company. It is one of the world’s leading crop protection and specialist seeds companies, producing products to help farmers protect their crops against damage caused by weeds, pests and disease. With operations based in Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Europe and the Americas, Nufarm sells products in more than 100 countries around the world. Find out more about Nufarm here.

Zegami is a web application which allows users to filter, sort and chart data from experiments undertaken in the Smarthouses at the APPF Adelaide node, with the unique feature of being able to group that data with the corresponding images. To get a real feel for the application, we highly recommend you watch the video. Further reading here.