agricultural science

Want to fly drones? New Remote Pilot Licence training course available

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Dr Ramesh Raja Segaran from APPF partner, URAF

The Unmanned Research Aircraft Facility (URAF) at the University of Adelaide, is offering a commercial drone course leading to the award of a Remote Pilot Licence (RePL) by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority of Australia (CASA).

This five-day intensive RePL course is conducted on University of Adelaide campuses by a team of CASA-certified drone operators and trainers from the University.

Course inclusions

  • All required theory and practical syllabus and requirements of CASA for a RePL.
  • Aeronautical Radio Operator Certificate (AROC).
  • English Language Proficiency certification (ELP).
  • Textbook: Remote Pilot Licence RePL Study Guide by Bob Tait and Ben Harris.
  • In-house examinations for ELP, AROC and RePL.

Assured quality teaching

Courses available

The URAF run regular RePL courses 4-6 times a year. Ad hoc RePL courses for government and industry groups are also available.

  • Remote Pilot Licence Course, Multi-rotor up to 7kg
    • $3500 + GST (includes textbook and application fees for RePL, AROC, ELP)
  • Practical type training for Multi-rotor/ Fixed wing up to 25kg
  • Others
    • If you have passed an aeronautical knowledge exam for a flight crew licence (e.g. PPL/ CPL), you can complete practical type training with the URAF to get type rated for a RePL.

Who needs a RePL?

Please contact the URAF for more information on the courses and how to enrol.

Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences 2017-2026 released

Grow. Make. Prosper. The Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences was published in June 2017 and presents the strategic vision for Australian Agricultural Sciences in the next decade.

The plan outlines strategies to improve the strength and efficiency of agricultural research in Australia in ways that will increase the ability of governments and producers to maintain productivity and efficiency in the face of evolving natural challenges. Successfully identifying, developing and deploying the next generation of game-changing scientific advances remains an active and ongoing challenge. The plan also outlines strategies to capitalise on emerging technologies that will affect the agricultural sciences.

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Agriculture is vitally important to Australia’s economy and social fabric, and contributes to global health and wellbeing. It faces a range of challenges across biophysical, economic and social arenas. Opportunities for technological and production improvements are continuously being identified from scientific research. However, to attain step change improvements in profitability, productivity and sustainability into the future will require integrated multidisciplinary research underpinned by a well-resourced science research pipeline.

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility plays a key role in supporting the next generation of agricultural research designed to answer some of these challenges. This month we will meet with colleagues from fellow NCRIS facilities TERN, BPA, ALA, NeCTAR and NCI to explore opportunities for collaboration, determine where overlaps or synergies occur and discuss bigger picture ideas to ensure NCRIS funding is used most effectively.

Read the full Decadal Plan for Australian Agricultural Sciences (2017-2026) here.

Find out more about the APPF here.

National National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS)

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN)

Bioplatforms Australia (BPA)

Australian Atlas of Living (ALA)

National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources (NeCTAR)

National Computational Infrastructure (NCI)

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