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Solving the challenges of computer vision for plant phenotyping

Plants in spectral pheno climatron ANU

Plants in Spectral Pheno Climatron at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s Canberra ANU node

A ‘Computer Vision Problems in Plant Phenotyping‘ (CVPPP) workshop will be held in conjunction with ICCV 2017 this October in Venice, Italy.

Recommended by Dr Tim Brown from the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility‘s Canberra ANU node, the goal of this third CVPPP workshop is to continue to showcase the challenges raised by and extend state-of-the-art computer vision for plant phenotyping.

Workshop date:

  • 28 October

Target audience:

  • computer vision experts interested in novel application fields, well accessible to computer vision, but different in requirements, and
  • plant phenotyping scientists with rich expertise in image processing and computer vision interested in standardisation, as exact problem formulations in fact allow defining standards.

Find out more CVPPP 2017.

ICCV 2017 (International Conference on Computer Vision) is the premier international computer vision event comprising the main conference and several co-located workshops and tutorials. The conference will be held in Venice, Italy from 22-29 October, 2017. Find out more ICCV 2017.

To discover a full calendar of unmissable plant science events for 2017 and beyond, go to ‘Events‘ on the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s website, or our blog.

Be sure to subscribe to our blog for more plant science news and stay connected on Twitter @AusPlantPhenom.

Turbo charging crops to feed the billions: An interview with Prof Bob Furbank

The former Director of the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility‘s Canberra node at CSIRO, Professor Bob Furbank, has given an excellent interview on ABC Radio, discussing plant research and the global challenge to feed 9 billion people by mid-century.

Bob Furbank.png

Now Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Translational Photosynthesis at
Australian National University in Canberra, Bob talks about his experiences in early photosynthesis research and his part in the C4 Rice Consortium.

The C4 Rice Consortium coordinates efforts from labs all over the world trying to isolate the genes responsible in C4 plants and apply them in C3 plants. If successful, yields in wheat and rice are expected to be 50% higher than present. An impressive result seen as vital for future food security. The consortium is led by Jane Langdale at the University of Oxford and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Listen to the interview or read the full transcript here.

From lab, to field, to forest!

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) knows no bounds, developing new technologies to ensure that the facility remains at the international forefront of plant science.

We can capture an image of a plant with ease, but how many megapixels does it take to image a forest? Dr Tim Brown would tell you it is 780 megapixels.

Tim and Prof Justin Borevitz from the APPF’s node at ANU have developed a “Gigavision” camera that takes hourly panoramic images made up of 200 x 18MP DSLR photos to create a 780 megapixel image of the forest.

What can a researcher do with this massive image you might ask? The resolution of the image allows researchers to track daily, seasonal and diurnal variation (plant behaviours) in the forest, tree and even leaf levels for thousands of trees in each forest.

ACT arboretum gigapixel image1

The first image of the Arboretum Forest, Canberra. Try it yourself here: https://traitcapture.org/gigapixels/by-id/58a3c186f7f5662afb647ef6. Go to the link and click on any tree within the image and zoom in to see the individual leaves on every tree.

Sensing and monitoring tools the APPF is developing at the research forest can be applied to other field ecosystems, such as commercial forests and national parks. Other tools include a pipeline to convert drone flight information into 3D models. APPF staff are available to help individual researchers or research groups set up these field tools at their own field sites.

The ANU research forest at the arboretum is available to national and international researchers for their own field experiments in a unique environment. All data is available for research use upon request.

For more information contact Tim Brown.