field research

Invitation: ‘Drones in research’ webinar series

Ramesh Booleroo field Drone flight 2 (edited)

Dr Ramesh Raja Segaran from APPF partner, URAF, demonstrating field phenotyping with a drone

Australian National Data Service (ANDS) is running two webinars on ‘Drones in Research’ this July. The webinars are free of charge and open to anybody who uses drones for research, or has an interest in doing so. They will be of particular interest to:

  • Researchers (academia, industry and government)
  • Data managers and data librarians
  • Data scientists, analysts, developers and technologists
  • Environmental and geo-scientific research data community
  • Research Office, Ethics Committee members and Legal Counsel for institutions

 

  • Webinar #1:  An eye on legal, ethics, safety & privacy
    When:  Thursday, 20 July 2017 at 12.30pm AEST (one hour duration)
    Description:  When deploying drones for research, it is important to be aware of legal and privacy issues under current Australian law, and have an understanding of public safety and community attitude.

    Speakers:  Melanie Olsen, AIMSA requirement of special licensing from CASA for drone useDes Butler, QUTThe privacy implication of using drones under current Australian lawLeanne Wiseman, Griffith UniversityDrones and geospatial data: A look at the legal and ethical issues [IP and copyright].

  • Webinar #2:  Rise of drones in the Australian research space
    When:  Thursday, Thursday 27 July 2017 at 12.30 AEST (one hour duration)Description:  This second webinar brings together researchers and data specialists from various disciplines to showcase their drone applications and data expertise, and to share knowledge to enhance research capabilities.

    Speakers:  Siddeswara Guru, TERN – Making drone data open for scientific research – Kim Bryceson, QUT – Automation of drone data capture in agriculture and development of GIS data library – Third speaker TBC.

The webinars are free, however, registration is required.

Both webinars will be recorded. If you can’t attend, please do register and ANDS will send you the recording and additional links.

Click here for more information and to register.

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) and ANDS are part of a community of facilities supported by the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). The NCRIS network currently supports national research capability through 27 active projects and is comprised of 222 institutions employing well over 1,700 highly skilled technical experts, researchers and facility managers. NCRIS facilities are used by over 35,000 researchers, both domestically and internationally.

From lab, to field, to forest!

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) knows no bounds, developing new technologies to ensure that the facility remains at the international forefront of plant science.

We can capture an image of a plant with ease, but how many megapixels does it take to image a forest? Dr Tim Brown would tell you it is 780 megapixels.

Tim and Prof Justin Borevitz from the APPF’s node at ANU have developed a “Gigavision” camera that takes hourly panoramic images made up of 200 x 18MP DSLR photos to create a 780 megapixel image of the forest.

What can a researcher do with this massive image you might ask? The resolution of the image allows researchers to track daily, seasonal and diurnal variation (plant behaviours) in the forest, tree and even leaf levels for thousands of trees in each forest.

ACT arboretum gigapixel image1

The first image of the Arboretum Forest, Canberra. Try it yourself here: https://traitcapture.org/gigapixels/by-id/58a3c186f7f5662afb647ef6. Go to the link and click on any tree within the image and zoom in to see the individual leaves on every tree.

Sensing and monitoring tools the APPF is developing at the research forest can be applied to other field ecosystems, such as commercial forests and national parks. Other tools include a pipeline to convert drone flight information into 3D models. APPF staff are available to help individual researchers or research groups set up these field tools at their own field sites.

The ANU research forest at the arboretum is available to national and international researchers for their own field experiments in a unique environment. All data is available for research use upon request.

For more information contact Tim Brown.