plant nutrients

Travel grant opportunity to attend the 34th Annual Root Biology Symposium

IPPN Root Phenotyping Working Group
Travel Grant for Researchers Using Phenotyping
IPG 2017, 34th Annual Root Biology Symposium
Columbia, Missouri, USA
7-9 June 2017

The IPPN Root Phenotyping Working Group (RPWG) encourages mobility among researchers and enhances international contacts between research groups. With this sponsorship grant RPWG  supports participation of Early Career Researchers at the IPG 2017, 34th Annual Root Biology Symposium.

  • Up to four grants of 500 EUR per researcher can be awarded.
  • 1 May 2017

Conditions:

  • You are affiliated with a university or a research institution and you are an early career scientist, PhD student, or postdoc who finished his PhD no later than ten years ago.
  • Please fill in the travel grant application and submit it to Saoirse Tracy.
  • The applications will be evaluated by the RPWG Board.

Getting to the root of plant zinc health

Sunlight and water are two obvious requirements essential for healthy growth of plants, but did you know that zinc is also a vital ingredient? Zinc is a critical nutrient in hundreds of enzyme systems which are necessary for normal plant function. Zinc is also critical for human health – in fact, zinc is involved in more body functions than any other mineral.

Plants get zinc from the soil via their root systems. This uptake of nutrients is enhanced in many plants by mycorrhizal fungi which colonise the roots, creating a vast connection between the plant roots and the soil around them. Mycorrhizal fungi effectively increase the surface area of the roots, collecting nutrients from the soil beyond the reach of plant roots alone, and transfer these nutrients back to the plant.

Scientist, Dr Stephanie Watts-Williams, wants to find out how such mycorrhizal fungi can improve the zinc nutrition of plants, and subsequently impact on human health – particularly in countries where zinc malnutrition is a serious issue.

Read on here about Stephanie and her research at The Plant Accelerator®, Australian Plant Phenomics Facility, and other Waite Research Precinct partners.

Discover more about Stephanie’s research here or find her on Twitter:  @myco_research

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Dr Stephanie Watts-Williams at The Plant Accelerator®, Australian Plant Phenomics Facility