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Drought knows no borders

The Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (APPF) was delighted to welcome His Excellency Mr Mohamed Khairat, Ambassador of The Arab Republic of Egypt, to its Adelaide node recently.

Egyptians share our love of wheat, however, they are heavily reliant on wheat imports which are struggling to keep up with demand. As a remedy, 1.5 million hectares of Egyptian land has been set aside for local wheat production, but there are challenges ahead. Egyptian wheat growers suffer from the same yield limiting issues of heat and drought as we do here in southern Australia.

While touring the facility, His Excellency shared his enthusiasm for future collaboration with the APPF’s Dr Trevor Garnett.

“There is a wealth of knowledge and experience at the APPF and the Waite Campus of the University of Adelaide in plant phenotyping and wheat production. His Excellency sees exciting opportunities for Egyptian scientists and PhD students to collaborate on research and share ideas on how to improve this essential crop”, said Dr Garnett.

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His Excellency Mr Mohamed Khairat, Ambassador of The Arab Republic of Egypt (pictured right) talks with Dr Trevor Garnett in the DroughtSpotter greenhouse at The Plant Accelerator®, Australian Plant Phenomics Facility (Adelaide node)

 

Phenomics Workshop at Purdue – be quick!

Purdue University’s Agronomy and Agricultural and Biological Engineering departments are offering a field-based Phenomics Workshop for crop research professionals involved in predicting yield and characterising biotic and abiotic stress, as well as engineers involved in developing and using sensors and sensor platforms for application.

Space is limited!

Date:  13 – 14 March 2017

Topics:  Prediction and Exploration of Agronomic Performance Using Integrated Data Sets • Effective Ground Truthing • Phenomics for Crop Improvement • Implementation of UAS Experiments • Image Analysis • Advanced Phenomic Analytical Techniques (i.e. reducing dimensionality, spatial statistics)

Cost:  $500 for professionals

Register here

For more information

Or contact Chad Martin – P: (765) 496­-3964   E: martin95@purdue.edu

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Planting a seed with STEM students

During January 2017 the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s (APPF) Canberra-based High Resolution Plant Phenomics Centre (HRPPC) is welcoming science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) students from across Australia to participate in laboratory visits as part of the annual National Youth Science Forum.

STEM education is key to enabling our next generation to tackle the challenges of a fast growing population, globalisation and climate change, underpinning innovation towards future solutions.

One of the challenges is feeding the world. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation estimates that about 795 million of the 7.3 billion people in the world, or one in nine, were suffering from chronic undernourishment in 2014-2016.

Research facilitated at the APPF is leading to the development of new and improved crops, healthier food, more sustainable agricultural practices, improved biodiversity care, and the use of crops to develop pharmaceuticals. By exposing students to this important area of research and encouraging cross-disciplinary approaches through STEM, the APPF hopes to plant the seeds of ideas that may unlock new solutions in the minds of the next generation of leading agriculture scientists and engineers.

This year the program for students visiting the APPF-HRPPC will emphasise the engineering aspects of our work, covering laboratory as well as field aerial data capture and analysis, and our aim of supporting a sustainable food future for our nation. The students will have the opportunity to interact with scientists, software engineers and mechatronic engineers, learn about the direct applications of the research conducted at the APPF, possible career paths they can follow and what the future offers in these fields.

The National Youth Science Forum is an immersive, 12 day residential science program aimed at students entering Year 12 who are passionate about STEM and wish to pursue careers in these fields. The residential program attracts over 400 students each year and connects students with researchers and visits to world class laboratories.

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Images:  Dr Xavier Sirault presenting to visiting National Youth Science Forum students at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility’s High Resolution Plant Phenomics Centre in Canberra